Using Industry Hazard Register Templates - Hasmate
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Using Industry Hazard Register Templates

Using Industry Hazard Register Templates

The following is an explanation of a Hasmate industry hazard register template. 

This document is to be:

  • Used as a basis for developing and improving the business’ risk management process.
  • Used as a training process for new and existing employees
  • Used for undertaking risk assessments on all hazards mentioned in the document (if appropriate), and any other identified hazards.
  • Used for the regular reviewing and risk re-assessment for all hazards.

Introduction

This is a reminder of what this document is for.


Hazard Risk Assessment and Decision Matrix

This is to be used when undertaking risk assessment on the hazards included in this document, and any other identified hazards.


Risk Rating Action Priority Scale

This helps you determine the risk rating of that hazard – A, B, C, D or critical/high/moderate/low.


The Hierarchy of Risk/Hazard Controls

How we control a hazard is determined by the hierarchy of controls – whether we can first eliminate the hazard, and if not, using  one or more control methods (substitution, engineering controls, administrative controls, and PPE) to minimise the risk “so far as is reasonably practicable”.


Table of Contents

This contains a list of all generic hazards included in the document.  As you identify contract or site specific hazards, add them into the list too.

The review dates are so you can document when the review is done.

If you are using the online Hasmate program, you can transfer this information by using the “Add Review” button against the hazard you are reviewing.


Contract and Site Specific Hazards and Risks

This is where you can add in information specific to your business.

  • Initial assessment by – who in the business undertook the assessment.
  • Date Assessed – when it was completed.
  • Hazard Review Dates – this is when you re-assess the hazard/risk after a given time (3/6/12 months) to determine if the controls that have been put in place have been effective. This reassessment can also be triggered by a change in work method or practice, a change in machinery or equipment, or an incident or accident resulting in an injury, or an impact on the business.
  • By Whom – who in the business undertook the re-assessment.
  • Identified actual or potential hazards and/or risks – each hazard should be on a new line.  Give detail so that others understand the hazard too.
  • Actual or potential harm or illness – note down what harm, illnesses, injuries, or notifiable events that could result from the hazard.
  • Causal Factors – note down what can cause the harm.  Identifying the causal factors with the input of your employees will give you a greater insight into what are the real reasons that a hazard or risk occurs.
  • Risk Rating – this is where you carry out your initial, first or pre-rating of the hazard to indicate the criticality level of the hazard or risk. This is completed using the “Hazard Risk Assessment and Decision Matrix” (likelihood x consequences) assessment to determine the risk level.  It is recommended that if the risk indication is low, and you know from your experience that there is a chance of an event occurring, to overstate the risk level, and then to reassess it later. Record the risk rating (A, B, C, D) in the column provided.
    • Likelihood – is the probability that during the period of exposure, individuals will actually come in contact with the hazard resulting in harm/illness.
    • Consequence – is the result of contact with the hazard, also known as severity.  What is the potential impact of the event?
    • Risk Rating – is the result (A, B, C, D) based off using the “Hazard Risk Assessment and Decision Matrix” with the chosen Likelihood and Consequence.
  • Recommended Reasonable Practicable Controls – document the most appropriate practicable controls based on your experience, in conjunction with what is recommended in standards, codes of practice, industry standards, and other credible information. These controls can also be set up in a progressive structure to reflect a safe operating procedure for the safe application of the management of the hazard/risk.
  • Control Methods – can the hazard or risk be eliminated? This is your first priority for effective hazard/risk management. If it can’t be eliminated, note down the other method of controls that you’ll use to minimise risk – based off “The Hierarchy of Risk/Hazard Controls” information used earlier in the document.
  • Responsibility – who is going to manage this hazard, and that the controls are being used.

Generic Hazards and Risks

Much of this information has already been filled in.  Make sure you read this thoroughly, and add to it as appropriate.  From there, go through the risk assessment process, and fill in the Likelihood, Consequence, and Risk Rating columns – for each hazard.

  • Identified actual or potential hazards and/or risks – this has been filled in for you.
  • Actual or potential harm or illness – this has been filled in for you.
  • Causal Factors – this has been filled in for you.
  • Risk Rating – this is where you carry out your initial, first or pre-rating of the hazard to indicate the criticality level of the hazard or risk. This is completed using the “Hazard Risk Assessment and Decision Matrix” (likelihood x consequences) assessment to determine the risk level.  It is recommended that if the risk indication is low, and you know from your experience that there is a chance of an event occurring, to overstate the risk level, and then to reassess it later. Record the risk rating (A, B, C, D) in the column provided.
    • Likelihood – is the probability that during the period of exposure, individuals will actually come in contact with the hazard resulting in harm/illness.
    • Consequence – is the result of contact with the hazard, also known as severity.  What is the potential impact of the event?
    • Risk Rating – is the result (A, B, C, D) based off using the “Hazard Risk Assessment and Decision Matrix” with the chosen Likelihood and Consequence.
  • Recommended Reasonable Practicable Controls – this has been filled in for you.
  • Control Methods – this has usually been filled in for you.  However, check that this is how you are going to manage it in your business – and update if need be.
  • Responsibility – this has usually been filled in for you.  However, check that this is who is going to manage it in your business – and update if need be.

Other documentation that can be useful in conjunction with an industry hazard register template

Safe Operating Procedures for many hazards are available from purchase, or alternatively, can be written yourself based off the recommended practicable controls noted beside each hazard.


If you would like to purchase hazard register templates, please contact Hasmate to discuss.